Recent Posts

Spring Home Tips & Checklists

3/19/2018 (Permalink)

INTERIOR MAINTENANCE

General Cleaning. Spring is a good time to clean areas of the house that often go neglected. Dust or vacuum chair rails, window casings, tops of wall-mounted cabinets and ceiling fans. Launder or dry-clean fabric draperies and use a damp cloth to clean wood and vinyl blinds. 

If you detect grease residue in the kitchen, consider washing cabinets, backsplashes and walls with warm water and mild detergent. The same is true in the bathroom, where soap residue and fluctuations in heat and humidity combine to create the perfect breeding ground for mold and mildew. While you’re cleaning tile, look for areas of worn or missing grout, as these may lead to more serious water damage if not repaired.

Air Conditioning. Just as you readied your furnace for fall, now is the time to make sure that air conditioning units are in good working order for the warmer months ahead. Change the filter, check hose connections for leaks, and make sure the drain pans are draining freely. In addition, vacuum any dust that has settled on the unit and connections; over time it can impact the air conditioner’s effectiveness.

Attics. Search for signs that indicate insects and critters have colonized. Also, search aggressively for mold, which often takes the form of “gray or black blotches that look like staining,” according to Tim Gentry, vice president of technical services, DaVinci Roofscapes, Kansas City, KS. Proper insulation and good ventilation will deter mold growth in the attic, so take action now to prevent the problem from developing in the warmer months ahead.

Basements. The basement—prone to dampness and insects—must be part of any thorough seasonal maintenance effort. Dampness suggests higher than normal relative humidity, inadequate ventilation and the need for a dehumidifier. Check the base of poured-concrete walls. 

Leaks. Spring is a good time to check for leaky faucets, clogged drains and sweaty pipes. Check under the kitchen and bathroom sink to make sure connections on pipes and hoses are properly sealed, and look for any wetness around the dishwasher that could signal an existing or potential problem. The same is true of your laundry room; check washer machine hoses for cracks, bulges or dampness. The same is true for hot water heaters, which may show sign of corrosion and leaks.

For more information take a look: https://www.bobvila.com/articles/2355-spring-home-maintenance-checklist/

How to get rid of Holiday stains

12/26/2017 (Permalink)

The holidays are many things: Festive, indulgent, an utter mess. And that indulging, as we all have learned one way or another, can wreak havoc on our clothes and table linens.

More than almost any other time of the year, the holidays are packed with special occasion foods and drinks we consume that create particularly egregious stains.

If your holiday festivities result in all new stains, spills and messes you’d rather not bring into 2018, here’s how to clean them all up.

Gravy and Other Greases

The holidays invite a lot of extra grease stains — delicious, buttery, oily grease stains.

When a grease stain happens, such as when pan drippings splatter on your clothes as you transfer the turkey from the roasting pan to its serving tray, massage a small amount of dish soap into the fabric and flush it with cold running water. Dish soap is designed to cut grease and has the built-in benefit of already being in your kitchen with you and your oily stains, making it convenient for spot-treating.

Of course, if a blob of gravy lands on the tablecloth as you’re ladling it all over your mashed potatoes, you shouldn’t be expected to dash to the kitchen. (The potatoes will get cold!) To treat older or more serious grease stains, dab a small amount of Lestoil or Pine Sol on the stain before laundering the item in cold water.

Because a grease stain can be obscured when fabric is wet, it’s best to air dry, rather than machine dry, because the heat can set stains. If the stain lingers after laundering, retreat it the same way and wash again; sometimes a second treatment is all a stubborn stain needs to be coaxed out.

For older, more set-in grease stains or spots on items that can’t be laundered, cornstarch or talcum will pull up the oil. Simply pile it onto the stain and leave it undisturbed for 12 to 24 hours, then brush away the powder and wipe any residue away with a damp rag or sponge.

Potatoes and Other Starches (Including Sweet Potato and Pumpkin)

Starches present a problem because of their tendency to become so glue-like.

Before laundering, scrape as much of the starchy food off the fabric using a butter knife or the edge of a spoon then flush with cool water to reconstitute the dried-on starch. Then, treat with a small amount of dish soap, liquid laundry detergent or a stain pretreatment product and launder.

Whipped Cream and Other Dairy

Dairy should be flushed with cold water then treated with an enzyme-based stain remover (like Zout) and laundered. It’s important to stick with cold water when treating dairy, whether on your clothes or on the dishes, because hot water will cause dairy to become gummy, making it more difficult to wash away.

Coffee and Tea

When a coffee or tea spill happens, start by flushing the area with running water to push as much of the stain out as possible. Then use dish soap and a light-colored rag or sponge to scrub at the stain, which should come out without too much trouble.

Lipstick

If a guest gets lipstick on your good napkins, don’t panic: Good old rubbing alcohol will take it right out. Apply the rubbing alcohol to cotton ball, rag or light-colored sponge and dab at the lipstick stains. Several passes might be required, so be patient.

If the stain has lightened but a bit of pigment remains, apply a small amount of liquid laundry detergent and wash the item in cold water, checking that the stain is completely gone before drying.

For more useful tips on how to get rid of "Holiday stains" refer to the article from The New York Times

Holiday Cooking Safety

12/22/2017 (Permalink)

The kitchen is the heart of the home. It’s where families gather to cook favorite recipes, share warm meals, and reconnect with each other, especially during the holidays.  Unfortunately, it’s also where two of every five reported home fires start.

  • Take steps to protect your home and family from cooking hazards:
  • Never leave cooking equipment unattended.  Turn off burners if you have to leave the room.
  • Supervise children closely in the kitchen.
  • Prevent fires by making sure your stovetop and oven are clean and free of grease and dust.  Clean the exhaust hood and duct over the stove regularly.
  • Keep the cooking area around the stove/oven clear of combustibles, such as towels, napkins, and pot holders.
  • Wear short or close-fitting sleeves. Loose clothing can catch fire.
  • To protect from spills and burns, use the back burners and turn the pot handles in, away from reaching hands.
  • Locate all appliances away from the sink.
  • Plug countertop appliances into Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI)-protected outlets.
  • Keep appliance cords away from hot surfaces like the range or toaster.
  • Unplug the toaster and other countertop appliances when not in use.
  • Be sure to turn off all appliances when cooking is completed.

Fast Facts: 

  • Cooking equipment is the leading cause of reported home fires and injuries.  It is also the leading cause of unreported home fires.
  • During 2004-2008, U.S. fire departments responded to an average of 154,700 home cooking fires each year.
  • Unattended cooking equipment is the leading cause of home cooking fires.

Mold during cold weather months

12/13/2017 (Permalink)

The wet season in the winter months is one of the best times of year for molds to grow and expand. Often mold is contained near sources of water where it can easily grow and reproduce. As it grows, mold can breakdown and compromise the integrity and strength of the source in which it lives.

Mold spores are microscopic and are naturally found in the air we breathe indoors and outdoors. Mold can be killed, but if it is not removed properly, it can remain in the area just cleaned and the dry spores can be released into the air. Mold remediation services can help eliminate the mold in your home and personal items affected by water damage.

Prevention, however, is what will help keep your lungs healthy and homes and buildings strong.

General Home and Building Maintenance:

  • Keep all areas clean.
  • Make sure there is good air circulation. Use an exhaust fan or open a window when showering, cooking, and washing the dishes.
  • Prevent mold and water damage by turning off the water flow to broken appliances and pipes.
  • Replace cracked or defective mortar in basements. If you find your basement is wet or has water leaking into it, inspect the outside drainage systems.
  • Spread moisture-barrier materials in crawl spaces over the soil. Heavy roofing paper or plastic film made of polyethylene can be used for this. Make sure there is good ventilation in the crawl space and, if possible, do not enclose it. One may need to use a fan to blow out humid air from under the building.
  • One can get rid of humidity or dampness within a building by heating it for a short time. After heating, open up the doors and windows, or use an exhaust fan, to let out the air that is moist.
  • Hire a professional roofing contractor to cover a damaged roof with a tarp or tent. This will help protect the building from the elements.
  • If there are freezing temperatures, take measures to insulate pipes inside and out to ensure they will not crack and/or burst.
  • Make sure all the seals on the windows and doors are not compromised and in good-working condition.
  • Clean and repair roof gutters regularly.
  • Make sure the ground around your building slopes away from the foundation so water does not collect around or enter in to it.
  • Act quickly if you see condensation on windows, pipes, or walls inside a building. Dry out the area and determine if the source of the condensation is from a leak or the result of high humidity.

After a Flood or Heavy Rains:

  • Work fast. Call in a mold remediation service, which will help in the cleaning and disinfecting of your home from toxins and spores mold can release.
  • Lower the humidity and temperature in the building: molds do not like these conditions. Open up windows if the air outside is less humid than the air inside. Otherwise, turn on an air conditioner and a dehumidifier.
  • Dispose of moldy items in a sealed bag. Objects that can be saved should be frozen (which deactivates mold) or dried out. Mold remediation services can assist with restoring many of your items, including documents, pictures, and books.
  • Make sure there is good ventilation within the building affected. Use a fan, if necessary, to promote good air circulation.
  • Remove as much standing water in a building as quickly and safely as possible after disconnecting all electronic equipment inside the building.
  • The two key things to remember in mold prevention are: 1. Keep everything clean, and 2. Keep everything dry. Many simple steps can be taken to prevent mold damage as well as water damage during the winter months. However, keep the number for a mold remediation service handy should you require their services. These professionals can efficiently and quickly ensure your home is safe, dry, and mold-free.

Ways You May Be Ruining Your Wood Floors

12/1/2017 (Permalink)

Forgetting to Sweep

Sweeping and vacuuming hardwood floors isn't only a good cleaning tip, but it can also lengthen the life of your floors. Dust, dirt, and other abrasive particles can scratch and dull the finish of wood floors once they’re underfoot. Tidying up often, though, will keep them from causing lasting damage.

Using the Wrong Vacuum Attachments

Vacuuming is an important chore for keeping dust and dirt off of your wood floors and out of tiny cracks and crevices—but use the right attachments. The beater bar on your vacuum can gouge wood floors; instead use the hardwood brush attachment.

Mopping

Water is a wood floor’s worst enemy. Moisture can penetrate the wood’s fibers causing boards to swell, cup, warp, and separate. If your hardwood floors need a deep clean, use a barely damp mop or cloth and then dry the floor immediately and completely with a towel.

Letting Spills Wait

Dried and caked on spills can take a lot of force to remove, if left to sit. Avoid that trouble (and possible damage) by wiping spills up immediately with a soft, clean cloth. If you need to use a spot of water to lift the spill, be sure to dry the floor thoroughly with a clean towel.

Wearing High Heels

No one would ever take a tiny hammer to their floors, but walking on wood with high heels can do similar damage. The force of walking in these sharp shoes can easily ding and scratch wood floors, so check them at the door. You can minimize the risk of scratches from other damaging items by placing floor protectors under table and chair legs, and keeping the dog's claws clipped and trimmed.

websource

Cold Weather Safety Tips for pets

11/20/2017 (Permalink)

Exposure to winter’s dry, cold air and chilly rain, sleet and snow can cause chapped paws and itchy, flaking skin, but these aren’t the only discomforts pets can suffer. Winter walks can become downright dangerous if chemicals from ice-melting agents are licked off of bare paws. To help prevent cold weather dangers from affecting your pet’s health, please heed the following advice from our experts:

  • Repeatedly coming out of the cold into the dry heat of your home can cause itchy, flaking skin. Keep your home humidified and towel dry your pet as soon as he comes inside, paying special attention to his feet and in-between the toes. Remove any snow balls from between his foot pads.
  • Never shave your dog down to the skin in winter, as a longer coat will provide more warmth. If your dog is long-haired, simply trim him to minimize the clinging ice balls, salt crystals and de-icing chemicals that can dry his skin, and don’t neglect the hair between his toes. If your dog is short-haired, consider getting him a coat or sweater with a high collar or turtleneck with coverage from the base of the tail to the belly. For many dogs, this is regulation winter wear.
  • Bring a towel on long walks to clean off stinging, irritated paws. After each walk, wash and dry your pet’s feet and stomach to remove ice, salt and chemicals—and check for cracks in paw pads or redness between the toes.
  • Bathe your pets as little as possible during cold spells. Washing too often can remove essential oils and increase the chance of developing dry, flaky skin. If your pooch must be bathed, ask your vet to recommend a moisturizing shampoo and/or rinse.
  • Massaging petroleum jelly or other paw protectants into paw pads before going outside can help protect from salt and chemical agents. Booties provide even more coverage and can also prevent sand and salt from getting lodged between bare toes and causing irritation. Use pet-friendly ice melts whenever possible.
  • Like coolant, antifreeze is a lethal poison for dogs and cats. Be sure to thoroughly clean up any spills from your vehicle, and consider using products that contain propylene glycol rather than ethylene glycol.
  • Pets burn extra energy by trying to stay warm in wintertime. Feeding your pet a little bit more during the cold weather months can provide much-needed calories, and making sure she has plenty of water to drink will help keep her well-hydrated and her skin less dry.
  • Make sure your companion animal has a warm place to sleep, off the floor and away from all drafts. A cozy dog or cat bed with a warm blanket or pillow is perfect.
  • Remember, if it’s too cold for you, it’s probably too cold for your pet, so keep your animals inside. If left outdoors, pets can freeze, become disoriented, lost, stolen, injured or killed. In addition, don’t leave pets alone in a car during cold weather, as cars can act as refrigerators that hold in the cold and cause animals to freeze to death.

Flood Safety Tips

11/14/2017 (Permalink)

Flooding can occur anywhere, but water and electricity don’t mix. Because electrical hazards may linger after flood waters recede, it’s important to take precautions before, during, and after flooding takes place.

Know the Danger

  • On average, more deaths occur due to flooding each year than from any other severe weather related hazard.
  • In the past 5 years all 50 states have experienced floods or flash floods
  • A car can easily be carried away by just two feet of floodwater
  • Nearly half of all flood fatalities occur in vehicles
  • Those living outside of mapped “high-risk” flood areas file nearly 25% of all flood insurance claims and receive 1/3rd of Federal Disaster Assistance aid
  • From 2003 to 2012, total flood insurance claims averaged nearly $4 billion per year
  • An area’s risk of flood can change over time due to new construction, changes in levee classification, or other environmental factors

Reduce the Risk

  • Follow any directives to turn off utilities. If you’re advised to switch off the main power source to your home, flip each breaker and THEN turn off the main breaker. You may also need to shut off the main valve for your home’s gas and water
  • DO NOT go near any downed power lines especially if there is standing water nearby
  • If your home experienced flooding, keep the power off until an electrician has inspected your system for safety
  • Have an electrician inspect electrical appliances that have been wet, and do not turn on or plug in appliances unless an electrician tells you it is safe
  • A trained professional may be able to recondition some devices while others will require replacement
  • Do not touch a circuit breaker or replace a fuse with wet hands or while standing on a wet surface

Types of Mold

11/13/2017 (Permalink)

There are many different mold types that can be found in homes and different health problems can occur depending on the type of mold to which you are exposed. While there are more than one hundred different kinds of mold sometimes found in homes, here we’ll discuss a few of the most common.

Common Types of Mold Found in Homes

Alternaria is often found outdoors, but it also grows in damp places indoors, like in showers or under sinks with leaky pipes. It can also be found in buildings that have been flooded or suffered other water damage. It spreads easily from one area of the home to another. Exposure to alternaria can cause allergic reactions and asthma attacks.

Aspergillus is a type of mold frequently found indoors. It can causes allergic reactions, respiratory infections, and a condition called hypersensitivity pneumonitis, which causes inflammation of the lungs. More about aspergillus mold.

Aureobasidium is a mold often found outdoors, but it can also be found in homes growing on wooden surfaces, wallpaper, and painted surfaces. It’s also often found on damp window frames and caulking. It is pink and black in color. Many people are allergic to aureobasidium. Follow the link for more information on pink mold in the bathroom.

Botrytis grows in areas with high levels of humidity, like bathrooms with poor ventilation. It can cause allergic reactions and asthma.

Chaetomium often grows on drywall, carpets and window frames that have sustained water damage. It produces a characteristic musty odor.

Cladosporium is a type of mold often found growing inside homes. While most types of mold prefer warm climates, cladosporium can grow in cool areas, too. It often grows on fabrics, like carpets, and on wood surfaces, like cabinets and floorboards. It can cause a variety of respiratory problems.

Fusarium is another of the mold types that, like cladosporium, can grow and spread at lower temperatures. It’s often found growing on water-damaged carpeting and other fabrics. It causes allergic reactions, asthma, and respiratory infections. People with compromised immune systems are particularly vulnerable to infections due to fusarium exposure.

Penicillium is often found growing on materials that have been damaged by water, including carpeting, wallpaper, insulation, and furnishings like mattresses. It’s one of the mold types that spread quickly and easily from one part of the home to another. Exposure to penicillium can cause allergic reactions, chronic sinus infections, and inflammation of the lungs. Usually appears as a blue mold and/or a green mold.

Stachybotrys chartarum is often referred to as “black mold” due to its slimy black appearance. It’s sometimes referred to as “toxic mold,” although the mold itself is not toxic; it produces toxic compounds called mycotoxins, which cause health problems when people come in contact with them. It can cause allergic reactions, breathing problems, chronic sinus infections, asthma attacks, fatigue, and depression. Stachybotrys chartarum has a characteristic musty odor and usually grows in places that stay damp all the time, like in air conditioning ducts where there is a lot of condensation or around leaky pipes. Learn more about black mold in homes.

Serpula lacrymans is a yellow mold that causes "dry rot" because it feeds on wood.

Trichoderma is often found growing on damp carpet, wallpaper, and other wet surfaces. It produces mycotoxins similar to those produced by stachybotrys chatarum, and it can cause similar health problems. Many people are also allergic to trichoderma.

Ulocladium requires a lot of water, so it frequently grows in areas with extensive water damage, including homes that have been flooded. It’s often found growing on wet walls. Many people are allergic to ulocladium.

Efflorescence are salt deposits that are often confused with white mold in basement.

Cold Weather Tips

11/13/2017 (Permalink)

When the temperature takes a nose dive, water in your pipes can freeze, causing them to burst. Water floods your home and ruins your furnishings, and you have to pay to have it all repaired and replaced. It’s costly and inconvenient. But it doesn’t have to happen if you follow these simple precautions.

Wrap Up for Winter
Wrap exposed pipes with insulating material.  Pipes under kitchen sinks, in crawl spaces, near windows or in unheated basements are areas susceptible to freezing. #WrapIt

Find Your Shut-off Valve 
Locate your inside water shut-off valve now!  The shut-off valve controls all of the water into your home.  If a pipe bursts, knowing the location of your shut-off valve and how to turn it off, can save valuable time and prevent water damage. Our video can help you find the water shuf-off valve.

The shut-off valve may be located in the basement, under the kitchen sink, in a utility closet, near the hot water heater, or even under the house in a crawl space.  If you cannot locate or do not have a shut-off valve, call your plumber. #TagIt

Try turning off your shut-off valve. Then turn on each of the faucets in your house, if no water comes out you found the main shut-off valve.  Once you locate the main shut-off valve tag it so everyone in your family can find it should an emergency occur.

Make Sure You Have it Covered

If your house has a crawl space, cover the outside vents to prevent winter winds from entering and freezing pipes.  Keep the garage door closed if you have a slab foundation.  Some water pipes are located under concrete floors in the garage .#CoverIt

Run a Small, Steady Stream of Cold Water
Keep the water running, especially if you’ve had problems with frozen pipes in the past. Try running a small steady stream of water from a cold water faucet in extremely cold weather. The cost of the water is small compared to dealing with the cost and inconvenience of frozen or burst pipes. Make sure you run the water from a faucet children don’t use, because they may inadvertently shut off the faucet after using it. #DripIt

Fall Safety Tips

11/9/2017 (Permalink)

When the weather turns cold most people spend more time inside their homes using fireplaces, furnaces, and heaters to keep warm. There's nothing quite as cozy as a fire, but it presents some safety hazards. Keep these tips in mind.

Service Your Furnace

Before the cold autumn and winter weather sets in, be sure to call your heating and cooling company to service your furnace. A specialist should inspect the furnace to make sure everything is in working order and that there are no leaks.

 

Use Fireplaces Safely

Keep that fire in its proper place by using a fireplace screen to keep sparks from flying out of the fireplace. Never leave a burning fire unattended, and make sure a fire in a fireplace is completely out before going to bed.

Use Caution with Space Heaters

A space heater can be an effective way to warm up a chilly room, but it's essential that you read the instructions on the unit before you use it. If your space heater requires venting, make sure you have vented it to the outdoors. Never use your stove or oven to heat your home; only use space heaters that are approved for this purpose. Always allow at least three feet of empty area around space heaters.

Reconsider Leaf Burning

The Air Defenders reports that burning leaves produces dangerous and cancer-causing chemicals and urges homeowners to avoid disposing of leaves this way. If you decide to burn leaves, wear a protective mask. Burning leaves should only be attempted far away from a house or other structures on a homeowner's property. Always check the weather forecast before starting to burn leaves. This activity should not be attempted in windy conditions.

Exercise Candle Caution

Candles are a great way to give a room that warm glow, but they can also cause fires. According to the National Candle Association, almost 10,000 home fires start with improper candle use. Never leave candles burning if you go out or go to sleep, and keep your candles away from pets and kids.

Change Smoke Alarm Batteries

Change the batteries in your smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors when you turn back your clocks for Daylight Saving Time. Make sure to check the alarms with the new batteries installed. Check and replace any home fire extinguishers that have expired.